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Posts tagged ‘Windows Server 2012 R2’

Installing .NET Framework 3.5 on Windows Server 2012 R2 Fails with Error Code 0x800F0906


I encountered this issue while working on a project for a client, involving server build automation.

The client provided me with a copy of their Windows Server 2012 R2 ISO, which I was using in my SCCM Build and Capture task sequence. As you can see from the screenshot, the Task Sequence includes copying the SXS folder onto the local system, in order to be able to install .NET Framework 3.5 (using the -Source parameter).

Build And Capture TS - Scrubed

However, after the OS was installed, I noticed that the .NET Framework 3.5 and PowerShell options (which are also apart of the build) were not installed successfully. I checked, and confirmed that the SXS folder was still present (at the root of C:\). So, I attempted to run the PowerShell install command manually to see if/why it failed. I encountered the following error.

Install Error Results

This was odd, since it worked for my Build and Capture of Windows Server 2012. So, off to Google with the error code, and I came across this TechNet article which explained everything:

http://blogs.technet.com/b/askpfeplat/archive/2014/09/29/attempting-to-install-net-framework-3-5-on-windows-server-2012-r2-fails-with-error-code-0x800f0906-or-the-source-files-could-not-be-downloaded-even-when-supplying-source.aspx.

In a nutshell, there was a Security Update that was released that updated some of the .NET components (KB2966828). According to the TechNet article “If either of these updates are installed, you will run into the above issue if your server does not have access to the Internet to pull the updated components.”

The solution?

  1. Uninstalled the security update
  2. Install .Net Framework 3.5
  3. Reinstalled the update

Refer to the TechNet article for additional options/details. Hopefully this will help anyone that comes across this issue.

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SCOM 2012 R2 Data Access Service (DAS) High Availability – Part 4: Enable NLB on each Management Server > Add A Host to NLB Cluster


In the previous post in this mini-series, we created a NLB cluster, and added the first SCOM Management Server. Now we will add the second SCOM Management Server to the cluster.

Use the following procedure to add hosts to a Network Load Balancing (NLB) cluster.

You can also perform the task described in this procedure by using Windows PowerShell. For more information about using Windows PowerShell for NLB clusters, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=140180.

When you are using Network Load Balancing (NLB) Manager, you must be a member of the Administrators group on the host that you are configuring, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority. If you are configuring a cluster or host by running NLB Manager from a computer that is not part of the cluster, you do not have to be a member of the Administrators group on that computer.

To ensure that Network Load Balancing Manager is displaying the most recent host information, right-click the cluster and click Refresh. This step is necessary because the host properties that Network Load Balancing Manager displays are a copy of the host properties that were configured the last time Network Load Balancing Manager connected to that host. When you click Refresh, Network Load Balancing Manager reconnects to the cluster and displays updated information.

As a reminder, we’ll break the articles/posts down into smaller pieces. Here is a high-level of each piece.

Step 1: Configure A Static IP Address

Step 2: Enable NLB on each Management Server > Install Network Load Balancing

Setp 3: Enable NLB on each Management Server > Create A NLB Cluster

Setp 4: Enable NLB on each Management Server > Add A Host to NLB Cluster

 

Let’s continue with the fourth step.

Enable NLB on each Management Server > Add A Host to NLB Cluster

Now that we have a Network Load Balance Cluster created, we can now add the second SCOM Management server to the cluster.

Let’s log into our first Management Server to begin.

 

Start by launching Server Manager, click on Tools, then click Network Load Balancing Manager.

Server Manager - Launch NLB Manager

 

Right-click the cluster where you want to add the host and choose Add Host To Cluster. If NLB Manager does not list the cluster, connect to the cluster.

Add Host To Cluster

 

Type the host’s name and click Connect. The network adapters that are available on the host will be listed at the bottom of the dialog box.

Add Host To Cluster - Connect

 

Click the network adapter that you want to use for Network Load Balancing and then click Next. The IP address configured on this network adapter will be the dedicated IP address for this host.

Add Host To Cluster - Connect2

 

Configure the remaining host parameters as appropriate, and then click Finish.

Host Parameters

Port Rules

 

Now our second Management Server has been added into the NLB Cluster.

Network Load Balancing Manager

 

When you launch the SCOM Console, enter the NLB Cluster name instead of a specific Management Server.

SCOM Console - Connect To Server

 

We have now successfully made the SCOM Data Access Service highly available.

SCOM 2012 R2 Data Access Service (DAS) High Availability – Part 3: Enable NLB on each Management Server > Create A NLB Cluster


In the previous post in this mini-series, we installed the Network Load Balancing feature on each of our Management Servers. Now we will create a NLB cluster.

To configure the Network Load Balancing (NLB) cluster, you must configure three types of the parameters:

  • Host parameters, which are specific to each host in a NLB cluster.
  • Cluster parameters, which apply to an NLB cluster as a whole.
  • Port rules, which control how the cluster functions. By default, a port rule equally balances all TCP/IP traffic across all servers. Some applications may require different or additional port rules to operate correctly. For example, when using NLB in a Remote Desktop Services environment, you will need to modify these default rules.

You can also perform the task described in this procedure by using Windows PowerShell. For more information about using Windows PowerShell for NLB clusters, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=140180.

When you are using Network Load Balancing (NLB) Manager, you must be a member of the Administrators group on the host that you are configuring, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority. If you are configuring a cluster or host by running NLB Manager from a computer that is not part of the cluster, you do not have to be a member of the Administrators group on that computer.

As a reminder, we’ll break the articles/posts down into smaller pieces. Here is a high-level of each piece.

Step 1: Configure A Static IP Address

Step 2: Enable NLB on each Management Server > Install Network Load Balancing

Setp 3: Enable NLB on each Management Server > Create A NLB Cluster

Setp 4: Enable NLB on each Management Server > Add A Host to NLB Cluster

 

Let’s continue with the third step.

Enable NLB on each Management Server > Create A NLB Cluster

Now that the Network Load Balance feature is installed on each Management Server, we can now create a cluster.

Let’s log into our first Management Server to begin.

 

Start by launching Server Manager, click on Tools, then click Network Load Balancing Manager.

Server Manager - Launch NLB Manager

 

Right-click Network Load Balancing Clusters, and then click New Cluster.

NLB Manager - New Cluster
To connect to the host that is to be a part of the new cluster, in the Host text box, type the name of the host, and then click Connect.

NLB Manager - New Cluster - Connect

 

Select the interface that you want to use with the cluster, and then click Next. (The interface hosts the virtual IP address and receives the client traffic to load balance.)

NLB Manager - New Cluster - Select Interface

 

In Host Parameters, select a value in Priority (Unique host identifier). This parameter specifies a unique ID for each host. The host with the lowest numerical priority among the current members of the cluster handles all of the cluster’s network traffic that is not covered by a port rule.

You can override these priorities or provide load balancing for specific ranges of ports by specifying rules on the Port rules tab of the Network Load Balancing Properties dialog box.

In Host Parameters, you can also add dedicated IP addresses, if necessary.

Click Next to continue.

NLB Manager - New Cluster - Host Parameters
In Cluster IP Addresses, click Add and type the cluster IP address that is shared by every host in the cluster. NLB adds this IP address to the TCP/IP stack on the selected interface of all hosts that are chosen to be part of the cluster.

NOTE: NLB does not support Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP). NLB disables DHCP on each interface that it configures, so the IP addresses must be static.

Click Next to continue.

NLB Manager - New Cluster - Cluster IP Addresses

NLB Manager - New Cluster - Cluster IP Addresses (Completed)
In Cluster Parameters, select values in IP Address and Subnet mask (for IPv6 addresses, a subnet mask value is not needed). Type the full Internet name that users will use to access this NLB cluster.

In Cluster operation mode, click Unicast to specify that a unicast media access control (MAC) address should be used for cluster operations. In unicast mode, the MAC address of the cluster is assigned to the network adapter of the computer, and the built-in MAC address of the network adapter is not used. It is recommend that you accept the unicast default settings.

Click Next to continue.

New Cluster - Cluster Parameters

 

In Port Rules, click Edit to modify the default port rules, if needed. Then click Finish.

New Cluster - Port Rules

 

Back in the Network Load Balancing Manager, the new cluster will appear with the IP Address assigned, and the host we added will show as started.

NLB Manager (Completed)

 

Now our first Management Server has been added into the NLB Cluster.

In the next post in this series, we will move onto Step 4: Enable NLB on each Management Server > Add A Host to NLB Cluster.

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